Read more

"/>
Causes Of Snake Plant Mushy Leaves and 5 Critical Signs To Watch Out For

Causes Of Snake Plant Mushy Leaves and 5 Critical Signs To Watch Out For

Snake plant mushy leaves are a common problem most gardeners encounter when growing this plant, both indoors and outdoors.

Snake plants (Sansevieria) are hardy green plants that most gardeners love to grow. These plants are quite sensitive to soil moisture that mainly kills them by causing root rot. Overwatering your snake plant can cause your plant’s leaves to turn yellow, droop, or become mushy and other problems.

This guide will help you tell when your snake plant is overwatered and how to prevent your plant from dying due to waterlogging.

Causes Of Snake Plant Mushy Leaves

Overwatering is the primary cause of mushy leaves. An overwatered snake plant shows signs that include drooping, leaves turning yellow, and falling over easily. If you notice that your snake plant mushy leaves and rotting roots, save your plant by –

  • Removing the plant from its pot and cutting off any rotting roots
  • Re-potting it using a fresh potting mix to save the snake plant from dying
  • Placing your newly re-potted plant where it receives bright indirect light.

Signs Of Overwatered Snake Plants

It is easy to tell your snake plant is waterlogged simply by looking at the leaves. An overwatered snake plant’s leaves are mushy, limp, and squishy. You may also notice that they are occasionally falling over. If you are unsure, you can test for wetness by pushing your index finger through the topsoil to check for excess water.

Here are more signs to watch out for if you suspect you have overwatered your snake plant.

Soft, mushy, or squishy leaves or snake plant soggy leaves

When you feed your snake plant with excess water, substantial damage happens to the leaf cell structure. Due to this excessive water intake, the leaves eventually burst. These leaves end up becoming the popular snake plant mushy leaves – they are soggy, mushy, and squishy.

A healthy snake plant has firm green leaves standing upright from its plant’s base. The leaves act as water storage surfaces holding water absorbed from the soil within the inner surface of the leaf.

snake plant mushy leaves

Smelly Soil And Rotting Roots

Root rot is a fungus and bacterial infestation considered dangerous to snake plants. The most common cause of root rot is overwatering -the soil stays in a damp state over extended periods. Wet soils provide an appropriate environment for bacteria, fungus, and worms that destroy the roots of the plants, causing them to wilt and eventually dry out.

You can easily tell if your plant is suffering from root rot by smelling your plant’s soil. Use a smidgen, placing it close to the plant’s base into your nostrils. A smelly soil sample shows a sign of fungi resulting from dampness. When you notice this sign, check the roots for further signs of root rot.

A healthy snake plant has crusty white roots. If you notice sections of the roots turning black or brown, it could be that your plant is suffering from root rot. It’s recommended that you remove the affected roots, wash the plant with clean water, and transplant it to a new potting medium.

Drooping Leaves

Drooping leaves are a sure indication that your plant has a problem. However, the main reason for drooping leaves is too much water. Underwatering and nutrient deficiency are also causes of your drooping leaves.

If you notice snake plant mushy leaves start drooping, check the soil to see if:

  • You have wet soil, which is proof that your plants are overwatered, leading to drooping leaves.
  • The soil is dry, meaning your plant is suffering from stress, poor temperatures, or even underwatering.
  • Drooping snake plants can also mean your plant has root rot, so you might need to check the roots and treat them accordingly.

Your Snake Plant Falling Over

It is okay for 1 or 2 leaves to fall over; however, if you notice many leaves falling over within a short period, it could be a sign that you are overwatering the snake plant.

Snake plants store water in their leaves; any excess intake triggers stress to the base of the leaves, causing them to fall over. Snake plant mushy leaves will cause the plant to fall over due to the heavy weight from the leaves.

Leaves Turning Yellow

Healthy snake plant leaves are green with variations from different species and varieties. Yellowing of the leaves is a sign of poor health caused by inadequate sunlight, overwatering, environmental stress, excess fertilizer, etc.

In overwatering cases, leaves turn yellow because the roots are suffocating and unable to absorb nutrients that keep the plant healthy.

How Do You Save A Mushy Snake Plant?

The most significant way to save your snake plant mushy leaves is by changing the watering cycle and reducing the amount of water the plant receives each week. Stop watering your plant until the soil dries out completely.

  • Move your snake plant to a sunny spot. Move your plant to a sunny spot to help it lose as much water as it can. However, avoid exposing it to excess sunlight for too long as this can worsen its stress.
  • Remove your plant from the pot and repot it. Be gentle with your mushy plant as you lift it out of the pot. Loosen the soil to make it easy to remove the plant from the pot. Gently pull your snake plant from the pot to expose the roots with the soil loose enough. Use a new potting mix that is well-draining and replant the snake plant. To prevent more waterlogging problems, do not water it for the first few days of replanting.

Soil Mixture for Snake Plants

Should I Cut Dead Snake Leaf Leaves?

If you have noticed brown tips on your snake plant, it shows that your plant is facing some stress in its growth journey. These brown spots are actually dead areas of the plant, and cutting them off won’t hurt it.

Use a thin knife to cut the dead leaves away; however, be careful not to damage the other leaves. Remove all the old leaves and others that you think are too tall. The younger leaves will continue to grow and preserve the look of your plant.

How Do I Know If My Snake Plant Is Rotting?

You can tell if your plant’s roots are rotting by observing the leaves’ general health. The leaves could be wilting or drying up due to an imbalance between the plant’s food supply and the leaves’ nutrient requirement. If left unchecked, root rot will stress your plant’s health to the point of death.

Key Takeaways:

Snake plant mushy leaves are enough signs to warn you of overwatering problems and sensitize you to save your plant as fast as possible before it dies.

How do you save a mushy snake plant?

The easiest way to save your snake plant mushy leaves and plant is by changing the watering cycle and reducing the amount of water the plant receives each week.  Stop watering your plant until the soil dries out completely.

Move your snake plant to a sunny spot.  Move your plant to a sunny spot to help it lose as much water as it can.  However, avoid exposing it to excess sunlight for too long as this can worsen its stress.
Remove your plant from the pot and repot it.  Be gentle with your mushy plant as you lift it out of the pot.  Loosen the soil to make it easy to remove the plant from the pot.  Gently pull your snake plant from the pot to expose the roots with the soil loose enough. Use a new potting mix that is well-draining and replant the snake plant.  To prevent more waterlogging problems, do not water it for the first few days of replanting.

Should I cut dead snake leaf leaves?

If you notice brown tips on your snake plant, it shows that your plant is facing some stress in its growth journey.  These brown spots are actually dead areas of the plant, and cutting them off won’t hurt it.

Use a thin knife to cut the dead leaves away; however, be careful not to damage the other leaves. Remove all the old leaves and others that you think are too tall. The younger leaves will continue to grow and preserve the look of your plant.

How do I know if my snake plant is rotting?

You can tell if your plant’s roots are rotting by observing the leaves general health.  The leaves could be wilting or drying up due to an imbalance between the plant’s food supply and the leaves’ nutrient requirement.  If left unchecked, root rot will stress your plant’s health to the point of death.

DutchEnglishFrenchGermanItalianPortugueseSpanish