Boston Fern Runners – Quick Guide!

Growing new Boston ferns from Boston Fern Runners is really easy. If you do this, you will end up with a tidal wave of Boston ferns and end up probably giving them away to every friend you know. I personally view this plant as being a bit of an invasive pest and I would suggest that you burn excess Boston Fern Runners – because if you throw them away in the organic matter garbage they will end up in compost and spread further. This is not desirable.

FAQs

What do Boston fern runners look like?

They are essantially a little stalk with a fern on the end. With time they develop roots and shoots and turn into a fern. This is how these ferns spread. Well they have a number of methods of spreading, but this is one.

How to propagate Boston fern?

The easiest method is to let Boston Fern Runners take root in a new pot or potting ball. Once the little fern has rooted, you can cut the runner loose from the mother and let it grow on its own.

How fast do Boston ferns grow?

They grow faster and faster as they get established. After about three years, these ferns become a bit of a pest and just keep multiplying. If you plant them in your garden they will invade the entire garden - I have even had them invade a lawn once. They are actually a seriously invasive pest.

Growing Boston Fern Runners
  • Fertilizer

Feeding your ferns fertilizer twice a year is recommended.  Use a slow-release fertilizer preferably as shown in the stick formation. I like these sticks as it is less easy to over-fertilize your plants.

Check Price on Amazon

  • Proper air circulation

Some people say air circulation is important for Boston ferns. My greenhouse is humid and has no air circulation at all, and I cannot get rid of the Boston ferns that got in there somehow. So I am sure this is a myth.

Final Thoughts On The Boston Fern Runners

Growing new Boston ferns from Boston Fern Runners is really easy. If you do this, you will end up with a tidal wave of Boston ferns and end up probably giving them away to every friend you know. I personally view this plant as being a bit of an invasive pest and I would suggest that you burn excess Boston Fern Runners – because if you throw them away in the organic matter garbage they will end up in compost and spread further. This is not desirable.

FAQs

What do Boston fern runners look like?

They are essantially a little stalk with a fern on the end. With time they develop roots and shoots and turn into a fern. This is how these ferns spread. Well they have a number of methods of spreading, but this is one.

How to propagate Boston fern?

The easiest method is to let Boston Fern Runners take root in a new pot or potting ball. Once the little fern has rooted, you can cut the runner loose from the mother and let it grow on its own.

How fast do Boston ferns grow?

They grow faster and faster as they get established. After about three years, these ferns become a bit of a pest and just keep multiplying. If you plant them in your garden they will invade the entire garden - I have even had them invade a lawn once. They are actually a seriously invasive pest.

If you have some Boston ferns growing in your home, you can propagate more using the runners. I have had a love-hate relationship, leaning more towards hate, with this fern for most of the 45 years I have been on this planet. These ferns take over – they produce more and more ferns, using their sneaky Boston fern runners.

If you wish to grow more Boston ferns, using the runners as a means to divide your plants, there are a few simple methods that work. You can take the end of the Boston fern runner and place it in a small pot. Let the fern take root.

If you want to be a bit fancy, you could clip the runner into one of these rooting balls. Rooting balls are just fantastic for rapidly multiplying plants. I have used them to grow mulberries, cherry guavas, guavas, and various other fruit trees.

Check Price on Amazon

In my area, Boston Ferns are in no short supply, so I have never tried them on this. But I know they will work. In fact, there is almost no way that you can kill a Boston fern. They are indestructible.

Check Out 5 Mesmerizing Italian Roses You Need In Your Garden

Growing Boston Fern Runners

Once you have successfully rooted your Boston Fern Runners, the next step is to sever them from the mother plant. Take the small rooted fernlets and do as follows:

  • A cool, moist, and shady location in dappled sun

They don’t like direct sunlight when they are getting started. Once established these ferns can take direct sunlight – water accordingly.  They should be watered regularly (at least once a week) during the spring and summer months.

But don’t let it get too dry. They do have water storage nodules that develop as they mature – young plants do not have these and are more sensitive to drought.

  • Moist and well-draining soil

It is important that your soil drains well and has good air circulation.  Soil with high organic matter content is best.  A lot of organic material helps keep the soil loose and moist. Coco Coir mixed into your soil really helps.

Check Price on Amazon

Many people recommend peat moss – this is a great medium, but the harvesting of this material is unsustainable and should be discouraged.  The ferns will not grow if there is too much water in the soil.   

  • Proper lighting

These ferns can tolerate direct sunlight once established, but I prefer them as a dappled shade plant. They naturally grow in a similar light regime. Once the ferns are established, if you dig around in the pot or soil you find these little potato-like nodules. Once they have these they are nearly indestructible.

  • Temperature

The ferns thrive between 60° F and 80° F. If they are exposed to temperatures of about 30°F or below, they will sacrifice their leaves and may emerge in spring from the soil again. Ideally, bring outdoor ferns inside when it gets colder.

Growing Boston Fern Runners
  • Fertilizer

Feeding your ferns fertilizer twice a year is recommended.  Use a slow-release fertilizer preferably as shown in the stick formation. I like these sticks as it is less easy to over-fertilize your plants.

Check Price on Amazon

  • Proper air circulation

Some people say air circulation is important for Boston ferns. My greenhouse is humid and has no air circulation at all, and I cannot get rid of the Boston ferns that got in there somehow. So I am sure this is a myth.

Final Thoughts On The Boston Fern Runners

Growing new Boston ferns from Boston Fern Runners is really easy. If you do this, you will end up with a tidal wave of Boston ferns and end up probably giving them away to every friend you know. I personally view this plant as being a bit of an invasive pest and I would suggest that you burn excess Boston Fern Runners – because if you throw them away in the organic matter garbage they will end up in compost and spread further. This is not desirable.

FAQs

What do Boston fern runners look like?

They are essantially a little stalk with a fern on the end. With time they develop roots and shoots and turn into a fern. This is how these ferns spread. Well they have a number of methods of spreading, but this is one.

How to propagate Boston fern?

The easiest method is to let Boston Fern Runners take root in a new pot or potting ball. Once the little fern has rooted, you can cut the runner loose from the mother and let it grow on its own.

How fast do Boston ferns grow?

They grow faster and faster as they get established. After about three years, these ferns become a bit of a pest and just keep multiplying. If you plant them in your garden they will invade the entire garden - I have even had them invade a lawn once. They are actually a seriously invasive pest.

Boston fern runners, or stolons, are shoots that come from the mother plant and can form new plants. They tend to dangle out of the edge of Boston Ferns that are potted and look quite pretty. In my opinion, the Boston Fern is an absolute pest, and you should be really careful with what you do with these runners.  Let me elaborate a bit in this article and help give you a guide on Boston fern runners and how to control these things so they do not take over your garden.

The Boston fern is one of the most common ferns in the Northeast United States. The Boston fern, Nephrolepis exaltata is a very hardy, quick-growing plant that grows in moist soil. It is an excellent choice for shady gardens and containers.

Let’s learn how to propagate Boston fern runners in this article.

Propagating Boston Fern Runners

Boston fern runners, or stolons, grow very quickly in the spring and summer months.  The runners, or stolons, emerge from the mother fern plant and will dangle over the edge of the pot in some cases. The runner will develop a small fern with leaves and roots on the end. This will, if rooted, develop into a new Boston fern plant. Boston fern runners are thus a method the fern plant uses to expand and cover more territory.

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How To Divide Boston Fern Runners  

If you have some Boston ferns growing in your home, you can propagate more using the runners. I have had a love-hate relationship, leaning more towards hate, with this fern for most of the 45 years I have been on this planet. These ferns take over – they produce more and more ferns, using their sneaky Boston fern runners.

If you wish to grow more Boston ferns, using the runners as a means to divide your plants, there are a few simple methods that work. You can take the end of the Boston fern runner and place it in a small pot. Let the fern take root.

If you want to be a bit fancy, you could clip the runner into one of these rooting balls. Rooting balls are just fantastic for rapidly multiplying plants. I have used them to grow mulberries, cherry guavas, guavas, and various other fruit trees.

Check Price on Amazon

In my area, Boston Ferns are in no short supply, so I have never tried them on this. But I know they will work. In fact, there is almost no way that you can kill a Boston fern. They are indestructible.

Check Out 5 Mesmerizing Italian Roses You Need In Your Garden

Growing Boston Fern Runners

Once you have successfully rooted your Boston Fern Runners, the next step is to sever them from the mother plant. Take the small rooted fernlets and do as follows:

  • A cool, moist, and shady location in dappled sun

They don’t like direct sunlight when they are getting started. Once established these ferns can take direct sunlight – water accordingly.  They should be watered regularly (at least once a week) during the spring and summer months.

But don’t let it get too dry. They do have water storage nodules that develop as they mature – young plants do not have these and are more sensitive to drought.

  • Moist and well-draining soil

It is important that your soil drains well and has good air circulation.  Soil with high organic matter content is best.  A lot of organic material helps keep the soil loose and moist. Coco Coir mixed into your soil really helps.

Check Price on Amazon

Many people recommend peat moss – this is a great medium, but the harvesting of this material is unsustainable and should be discouraged.  The ferns will not grow if there is too much water in the soil.   

  • Proper lighting

These ferns can tolerate direct sunlight once established, but I prefer them as a dappled shade plant. They naturally grow in a similar light regime. Once the ferns are established, if you dig around in the pot or soil you find these little potato-like nodules. Once they have these they are nearly indestructible.

  • Temperature

The ferns thrive between 60° F and 80° F. If they are exposed to temperatures of about 30°F or below, they will sacrifice their leaves and may emerge in spring from the soil again. Ideally, bring outdoor ferns inside when it gets colder.

Growing Boston Fern Runners
  • Fertilizer

Feeding your ferns fertilizer twice a year is recommended.  Use a slow-release fertilizer preferably as shown in the stick formation. I like these sticks as it is less easy to over-fertilize your plants.

Check Price on Amazon

  • Proper air circulation

Some people say air circulation is important for Boston ferns. My greenhouse is humid and has no air circulation at all, and I cannot get rid of the Boston ferns that got in there somehow. So I am sure this is a myth.

Final Thoughts On The Boston Fern Runners

Growing new Boston ferns from Boston Fern Runners is really easy. If you do this, you will end up with a tidal wave of Boston ferns and end up probably giving them away to every friend you know. I personally view this plant as being a bit of an invasive pest and I would suggest that you burn excess Boston Fern Runners – because if you throw them away in the organic matter garbage they will end up in compost and spread further. This is not desirable.

FAQs

What do Boston fern runners look like?

They are essantially a little stalk with a fern on the end. With time they develop roots and shoots and turn into a fern. This is how these ferns spread. Well they have a number of methods of spreading, but this is one.

How to propagate Boston fern?

The easiest method is to let Boston Fern Runners take root in a new pot or potting ball. Once the little fern has rooted, you can cut the runner loose from the mother and let it grow on its own.

How fast do Boston ferns grow?

They grow faster and faster as they get established. After about three years, these ferns become a bit of a pest and just keep multiplying. If you plant them in your garden they will invade the entire garden - I have even had them invade a lawn once. They are actually a seriously invasive pest.